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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Board of Higher Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 

. 

FIFTIETH 
ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1966-June 30, 1967 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



THE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

Winthrop S. Dakin, Chairman 
Amherst, Mass. 

Bernard J. O'Keefe, Vice Chairman 
Natick, Mass. 



Gene P. Grillo 
Joseph P. He ale y 
Patrick J. King 
Roger L. Putnam, Sr. 
Daniel C. Rich 
Margaret Spengler 
Frieda S. Ullian 
Esther S. Yntema 
Hon. Sherwood J. Tarlow 



Bradford, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 
Brighton, Mass. 
Petersham, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 
Newton Center, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Swampscott, Mass. 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

MAIN OFFICE 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Room 208, Tremont Building 
73 Tremont Street 
Telephone: CApitol 7-0719 
Supervisor of social Service 
Mrs. Teofilia K. Tattan 



BRANCH OFFICES 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 



51 Franklin Street 
Telephone: OSborne 2-7762 
District Immigration Agent 
Daniel J. Donahue 



LAWRENCE, MASS. 



Room 308-309, Blakeley Building 
477 Essex Street 
Telephone: MUrdock 2-2877 
District Immigration Agent 
Andrew W. Ansara 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



State Office Building 
235 Chestnut Street 
Telephone: REpublic 4-1018 
District Immigration Agent 
John A. Mclnnes 



WORCESTER, MASS. 



Room 401-402, Park Building 
507 Main Street 
Telephone: PLeasant 5-6815 
District Immigration Agent 
Edmund B. Meduski 



Publication #270 Approved by Alfred C. Holland - State Purchasing Agent 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 






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REPORT OF THE 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

FOR THE YEAR 
JULY 1, 1966 TO JUNE 30, 1967 



OUR GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY^ 2 i 1 I 1 



This year brings to a close fifty years of service the Division of Immi- 
gration and Americanization has been rendering in the Commonwealth in "bring- 
ing into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations the Commonwealth and its 
residents of foreign origin, and generally promote their assimilation and 
and naturalization." Established in 1917 as the Bureau of Immigration, in 

1919 it became the Division of Immigration and Americanization as part of the 
Department of Education. Its duties and functions have remained the same 
through the years. One million six hundred and ten thousand services have 
been given through our offices which are located in Boston, Fall River, 
Lawrence, Springfield and Worcester. Our records show 16,981 services in 

1920 with steady increases shown and the fiscal year ending June 30, 1966 a 
total of 45,034. Our largest amount of services recorded was in 1940 - 
53,633 - the year of the initiation of the Alien Registration Act» .The work 
of the Division is intensified and varied with world situations and economics 
of war, depression and enactment of various immigration, citizenship and 
general welfare laws. 

In a state which ranks 7th in the number of aliens with 40% of the popu- 
lation of "foreign stock" as defined in the 1960 United states census reports 
(foreign born persons and those with foreign born parents) denotes the mute 
testimony of the far-reaching and great demand for our services, 

NUMBER OF SERVICES 

Of the 45,034 services recorded in our statistics this year, the Boston 
Off ice shows 23,984; Fall River - 4,394; Lawrence - 7,243; Springfield - 
3,832 and Worcester - 5,581. Of the total services 10,000 concerned immigra- 
tion matters, no doubt because of the Immigration Act of 1965. Helping in 
reunion of families and giving information regarding labor clearances requir- 
ed which are now in so many cases, was a great part of these services. 

REUNION OF FAMILIES 

The Act of October 5, 1965, granting nonquota status to parents of 
United States citizens, and second preference category to unmarried children 
of aliens, as well as making more numbers available in the fifth preference 
category for brothers and sisters, has reunited many families. However in 
Massachusetts where we have a large Italian population, for many there are 
brothers and sisters waiting on the lists since 1955 for their turns to come. 



For a number of these who might qualify as skilled workers, we have assisted 
in filing applications with necessary translations of documents to show . 
skills, in hope of earlier issuance of visas. 

Assistance in filing petitions for brothers and sisters in countries as 
Ireland and England where the quota is current, has increased. Formerly, we 
were instrumental in making the affidavits of support in behalf of these 
relatives and their visa applications were issued on this basis. Now, be- 
cause of the labor clearance requirement and because the prospective employee 
is not physically present in the United states, it has been difficult to get 
employers, their immediate relatives are petitioning for preference category. 

The visa petition activity shows a tremendous upswing* United States 
citizens and lawful permanent resident aliens who previously had refrained 
from petitioning for close relatives because of the previous hopeless-looking 
quota situation in many instances, are now encouraged to file such petitions. 
Parents arriving in the United States from Italy, Greece and Portugal, who 
have adult children remaining abroad, have called at our offices within a few 
days of their arrival, in possession of the proper documents, prepared to 
file petitions for them. 

Since the Act of October 1965 further provided to have mentally retarded 
children join their families, to our knowledge five families were able to 
comply with all requirements to have reunions in the United States, One, a 
young Italian girl of 18, whose citizen parents and brothers were well-estab- 
lished apple orchard farmers, is happily engaged in helping out on the farm. 

Also we have particularly noted that under the several new provisions in 
the laws, Chinese parents have joined their children from Hong Kong; a number 
of them in the past year have adjusted to permanent residents as they had 
come as refugees, and even brothers and sisters of citizens have arrived from 
abroad in the past year. 

LABOR CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS 

For the many for whom it is necessary to have labor clearances to come 
to the United States, there are a number of obstacles. For many of the 
Canadian relatives, our clients have found that without the personal presence 
of the applicant, it is difficult to get employer sponsorship. Then for 
those who are willing to file the labor clearance, when told of the months 
before final issuance of visa is made and arrival of employee to start work- 
ing, many of the employers have refused to complete the process. 

Application for preferential status in this area, filed with the U. S. 
Immigration Service for either the third or sixth preference, because of the 
backlog of work, takes many months for action. 

The "live-in maid" applications seem to be as numerous as ever. Many 
are for persons in the West Indies. The majority have stayed at their jobs 
on arrival, but in a number of cases there has been dissatisfaction expressed 
because of living distance away from the city, or the desire to change to 



1966 NEW ARRIVALS 

Of the 15,120 immigrants destined to Massachusetts for the year 1966, 
persons came from the following countries: 

Canada . 2,092 

Italy 1,815 

United Kingdom 1,149 

Greece 772 

Poland 636 

China 486 

Germany 450 

Denmark, Norway, Sweden 238 

Cuba 227 

Colombia 147 

Argentina 87 

Haiti 71 

Dominican Republic 67 

Japan 66 

Eduador 59 

Philippines 59 

Mexico 34 

Yugoslavia 28 etc. 

As compared to the preceding year, some 3,000 less came from Canada, 
United Kingdom, Germany. An increase is shown notably in those from Italy, 
Greece, Portugal, Poland, China, no doubt due to the law of October 1965 
which established the pool for fifth preference permitting more brothers 
and sisters in the quota. Also, since parents from those countries are now 
nonquota, many of them, immediately on arrival into the United States, have 
been able to petition for second preference category for their unmarried 
adult children who are able to join them soon. 

OTHER IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 

The charts attached show the many aspects of services given in many 
phases of assistance to assimilation of the many foreign born persons in the 
Commonwealth. Adjustment of status to residents - other than Cubans - con- 
cerned 357 cases. A number of these were visitors in the United States who 
had married citizens in the United States and could apply without leaving 
the country under Section 245 of the Immigration Law. Five were Gree'< seamen 
for whom it was necessary to initiate action at some Consul abroad after the 
grant of voluntary departure by the U. S. Immigration Officials. This in- 
volved much correspondence, filing of papers, translation of records and 
final appointment from the Consul before departure abroad for the visa. A 
number of these were for persons from the West Indies who had come on a visit 
to the United States and then married United States citizens. The Consuls in 
Canada have been able to expedite action in these cases and the United States 
Immigration Service has been most generous in extending the time in the 
United States of such persons under immigration proceedings until such time 
as an appointment is given by the Consul. 



another type of work. In the case of the "domestic" who, on arrival, did not 
report to work to the employer for whom the labor clearance was granted but 
went to work in a factory, she came under immigration proceedings and the 
special inquiry officer found that she was excludable at entry because of 
lack of valid labor certificate. However, she was granted voluntary depar- 
ture, is getting a labor clearance for her preferred work and is hoping to 
return to the United States as a resident again. 

There is no doubt that the labor clearance requirement has proven to be 
a hardship and caused a decrease in the number of persons . entering the United 
States particularly from Canada and countries of the Western Hemisphere. 

RECENT IMMIGRATION 

From the United States Immigration Service Annual Report, it is noted 
that from 1965 to 1966, 323,040 immigrants were admitted to the United States 
of whom 126,310 were subject to numerical limitation. This is an increase of 
26,343 immigrants from the last year, the largest number since fiscal 1957, 
and before that 1927 which is due, no doubt, to the laws permitting reunion 
of families. 

Of the 323,040 immigrants, 10,000 or more had as place of intended resi- 
dence the following states: 

State Number of Immigrants 

New York 77,279 

California 73,073 

Illinois 18,158 

New Jersey 17,667 

Massachusetts 15,120 

Florida 14,028 

Texas 13,742 

In the past ten years, 119,661 immigrants came to Massachusetts of the 
total 2,879,388 immigrants admitted to the United States in that time. 

1966 15,120 

1965 11,455 

1964 12,650 

1963 13,571 

1962 11,578 

1961 12,091 

1960 11,953 

1959 • 9,855 

1958 10,128 

1957 11,260 



CUBANS 

The enactment of P.L. 89-732 on November 2, 1966 which provides for 
adjustment of the Cuban Parolees in the United states to that of permanent 
residents, shows an increase of services to persons of this nationality. We 
filed 500 applications in behalf of such Cubans in the past year which 
acoounted for at least 90% of the applications for such adjustment at the 
United States Immigration Office in Boston. We were fortunate to have the 
services of two Social Workers who, with their ability to speak and translate 
Spanish, expedited such applications. Personal documents are part of the 
applications. In translation services of 2,166 recorded this year, more than 
half of this number is for Spanish documents. 

The annual alien registration report lists 2,500 Cuban nationals in this 
Commonwealth, but an estimate of 6,000 is given by the various groups con- 
cerned with such persons. 

Massachusetts has the average group of Cubans; professional and other- 
wise. A great number are in clerical and sales categories and there are 
semi-skilled and unskilled working in hospitals and restaurants. Only two 
cases locally are known to be recipients of Public welfare assistance and 
many are advancing into their professional fields as accountants, teachers 
and dentists. 

For a number of those whom we assisted in filling the applications for 
family reunions through the airlifts, Castro has not permitted departure. A 
United States citizen mother still waits for her 15 year old daughter as she 
has been doing for the past four years. Because a sister is in jail as a 
political prisoner, the rest of the family of the young man who had arrived 
by a small boat from Cuba, still waits. 

For many of the relatives we are now assisting in making the necessary 
applications with pleas to the Mexican Government for temporary entrance from 
Cuba and thus to the United States. A number of the relatives still are able 
to go to Spain from Cuba, with living expenses provided by the established 
relative in the United States. We then assist in making the necessary affi- 
davits of support, etc., for parents, with information and procedures in 
getting labor clearances for brothers and sisters for final issuance of 
visas for reunion with their relatives. 

Already we have helped a number of Cubans in applications for United 
States citizenship and so, for many, Massachusetts is home without tfe<3 
mobility of the unsettled person. 

OTHER FAMILY REUNIONS 

We note also an increase of clientele from the independent countries, 
Costa Rica; Dominican Republic; Guatemala and the West Indies. Many of them 
had come as domestic "live -ins" with labor clearance and now come to us for 
assistance in filing forms to have their husbands and minor children come to 
the United States. 



It should be noted also that for some 42 applicants seeking to bring 
relatives from U.S. S. R. we have made the "Vyzov" made in English and the 
Russian languages. After proper notarization and legalization by the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth and authentication by the Department of State, it is 
sent to the relative in U.S.S*R, to present to officials for the permit to 
depart. Some 10 persons, to our knowledge, were successful in getting to 
this State in the past year. All seem to be given permit to visit for three 
months. 

Of those admitted for permanent residence, a mother from Lithuania who 
had left many grandchildren behind and is now with a daughter who had been 
separated from her since 1942 and is not happy in being apart from those with 
whom she had recent closer association. She may return. The father from 
Estonia and the sister who had spent years in Siberia are well adjusted and 
happy in their new home. 

Amazingly now with the Polish nonpreference quota being available, many 
of our applicants have been successful in getting job clearances through the 
Labor Office which are being sent abroad for action for young nieces and 
nephews. 

• ..." ! 

ALIEN REGISTRATION 

In 1967, 3,668,836 aliens reported under the Alien Address Program. Of 
these 3,210,768 were permanent residents. The states with the largest number 
of permanent resident aliens registering were: 

California 808,240 

, New York 558,777 

Texas 230,348 

Illinois < 213,104 

Florida 112,703 

(208,529 temporary - no doubt 
because of Cubans) 
New Jersey 164,943 

Massachusetts 131,489 

Michigan 129,482 

ALIENS IN MASSACHUSETTS 

131,489 were permanent residents so that Massachusetts is seventh in 
the United States with number of resident aliens or 4% of the total popula- 
tion. The nationality of these is: 

EUROPE -'- — -81,003 

Albania _ ' '/\ ..;.., 434 
Austria 600 

Belgium 265 

Bulgaria 37 

Czechoslovakia 158 



Denmark 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Latvia 

Lithuania 

Luxembourg 

Netherlands 

No rway 

Poland 

Portugal 

Rumania 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

United Kingdom 

U.S.S.R. 

Yugoslavia 

Other Europe 



243 

38 

1,043 

1,918 

- 4,361 

4,153 

382 

6,006 

13,812 

661 

2,394 

12 

1,401 

522 

8,450 

18,136 

139 

291 

889 

386 

642 

11,684 

1,681 

174 

91 



ASIA 



China 


2,246 


India 


385 


Indonesia 


20 


Iran 


167 


Iraq 


28 


Israel 


361 


Japan 


485 


Jordan 


102 


Korea 


262 


Lebanon 


529 


Pakistan 


29 


Palestine 


23 


Philippines 


293 


Other Asia 


321 



5,251 



Canada 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Haiti 

Jamaica 

Trinidad & Tobago 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 



35,231 

237 

2 , 500 

252 

242 

361 

64 

240 

42 



39,855 



Guatemala 147 

Honduras 261 

Nicaragua 30 

Panama 248 

*- SOUTH AMERICA 2,746 

Argentina 585 

Brazil 688 
Chile 82 

Colombia 684 
Ecuador 199 

Peru 220 
Venezuela 174 

Other South America ..; 113 

AFRICA - — —471 

Morocco 13 

South Africa . 165 

Tunisia 24 

U.A.R. (Egypt) 195 

Other Africa 74 

OCEANIA 365 

Australia 292 

New Zealand 71 

Other Oceania 2 

STATELESS ---> 1,102 

ALL OTHER '— 696 



CITIZENSHIP 

The United States Report shows that in 1966 124,178 persons were natura- 
lized in the United States. Of the persons naturalized 46,536 were males 
and 56,523 females. Their median age was 33.2. The states where the largest 
number were naturalized were as follows: 



New York 22,971 

California 19,830 

Illinois 7,451 

New Jersey 7,188 

Texas 4,694 

Massachusetts 4,304 

Pennsylvania 3,467 

Florida 3,189 

Ohio 3,133 

Michigan 3,132 



The nationalities of persons naturalized in Massachusetts: 

Italy 724 

Portugal 631 

Canada 568 

Germany. 326 v 

Ireland 364 * 

United Kingdom 313 

Greece . 275 

Poland 132 etc. 

In our offices we filled 1,772 applications for petitions for naturali- 
zation last year. With the addition now of form G-325A, all applications 
take considerable time. No longer is it required for persons to be citizens 
to qualify for old age assistance or benefits, but occasionally there is the 
elderly widow who is anxious to be a citizen to get into the housing project 
for which United States citizenship is required. Only lack of initiative 
and fear of not qualifying had prevented her from applying earlier; A number 
who had just the required residence have attended classes and have been able 
to become citizens because their incentive was that they could then petition 
for fourth preference category for their married children and have them 
reunited in the United States. 



OUR BOOKLET 

Yearly we have printed at least 10,000 booklets "Questions and Answers 
in Preparation for Naturalization Examination" which has been of great assis- 
tance to the applicants for citizenship. Each person applying for citizen- 
ship is given a copy and we distribute it to public school classes in 
citizenship, civic clubs, etc. 

IMPORTANT CITIZENSHIP CASE RULING 

The far-reaching decision in AFROYIM v RUSK case which reversed the 
ruling that United States Citizenship was lost by voting in a. foreign politi- 
cal election, has affected a number of our Italian born clients who had come 
to the United States with Italian passports. For several we have filed 
petitions as citizens in behalf of their children left abroad. I believe 
that there are many more persons in Massachusetts who had been refused U. S. 
passports because they voted in foreign elections who will now have their 
U. S. citizenship recognized. In addition, persons refused passports on the 
ground that they lost their nationality under other provisions of the statute 
may also continue to be citizens if the- loss of citizenship was not a volun- 
tary relinquishment as loss of nationality by naturalization in a foreign 
state; a formal declaration of allegiance to a foreign state; serving in the 
Armed Forces of a foreign state; accepting employment under a foreign govern- 
ment if foreign nationality is obtained or if the employment requires a 
declaration of foreign allegiance. 



~ OTHER CITIZENSHIP PROBLEMS 

There are still with us the persons who have lived in the United States 
so long and know very little about their entry as they came as children and 
for whom assistance must be given in getting evidence of residence prior to 
July 1, 1924. It is satisfying to the worker when, after much correspondence 
and ferreting of old records of assessors records, police listings, the 
application filed and granted, the person is naturalized. Eighteen such 
persons were assisted. 

For those acquiring citizenship through parents, we assisted them in 
filing 376 applications for Certificate of Derivative Citizenship. 133 
persons had lost their naturalization certificates so application had to be 
made for a duplicate one; 121 persons needed to get Declarations of Intention, 
required of them for employment purposes or to take medical or insurance 
examinations in this State, 

United States citizenship is a prized possession and even though many 
have heard of the ruling that United States naturalized persons do not lose 
their citizen :' * -* by protracted residence abroad, inquiries are often made 
for elderly people desiring to return to their country of birth. 

With the conveniently available evening classes for English and Citizen- 
ship in this state, it has been an incentive for the newcomer to apply for 
citizenship as soon as possible after the necessary residence pcriod.'as Ji<a"i5 
batter qualified. 

NEWCOMERS 

Our records show that 2,712 new arrivals from abroad have contacted us 
in various problems. Some are for general information of change of address 
notification, draft board locations, employment opportunities, evening 
classes, nonpayment of wages by employer, as well as assistance in procedures 
in application for family reunions. Our contacts with these persons are 
either through their relatives whom we had previously helped, or in answer to 
our letter of welcome and offer of assistance which is sent to each family 
arriving in Massachusetts as we receive these records. 

COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES 

We are glad to be the clearing house of information and referral to many 
social agencies sending clients to us. We answer many telephone inquiries 
as well. The cooperative spirit with the adult class principals and teachers 
is mutually beneficial. The courteous and prompt assistance from the U. S. 
Immigration Service is most gratifying «as we are mutually involved in so 
many cases. 

In noting the first year under the Immigration Act of October 5, 1965, 
for the first time the AMERICAN IMMIGRATION AND CITIZENSHIP CONFERENCE was 



held in Boston in December 1966 with many sponsoring agencies of which we 
were one. The one day conference with Senator Kennedy as the main speaker 
was most suffessful with some 2,000 attending. 

THE FUTURE 

A number of changes have already been made in easing barriers and 
expediting the approval of the required labor clearances. However, many 
discriminations still exist in the immigration law and many are of the 
opinion that legally admitted aliens could establish preference for their 
parents; that certain preference privileges should be accorded relatives of 
Astern Hemisphere as is for relatives in other countries. 

The Commission, established to study the ceilings on Western Hemisphere 
Immigration, is seeking an extension of a year for their report and further 
action. Bills of various aspects on immigration, as well as to ease natura- 
lization examination requirements, have been introduced into Congress. Al- 
though the Act of October 3, 1965 has made more family reunions possible, in 
cases of Italians where brothers and sisters in the fifth preference category 
who are waiting since prior to March 1955, has received the consideration of 
at least one Senator who promises introduction of legislation to help this 
situation. 

As in the past fifty years, this Division continues to serve and help 
not only the individual clients, but benefits communities and the Common- 
wealth by assisting the many persons of foreign background to become an 
integral part of the Community, State and County by voting, participation in 
and becoming part of the American Way of Life. 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

"Welcome to Worcester! BienvenidoJ Bonne AriveJ Haz GeldinJ KangeiJ Sen 
Sib CiJ" quoting a flyer from the International Center mentioning this is 
what they try to say to five hundred students, doctors and their families 
who come from over seventy different countries each year to study, work and 
also to impart their knowledge and skills at the various colleges, hospitals 
and foundations in this area. Our office assists these same people with 
information in many technical aspects of their stay, as well as permanent 
residence that many of which later become concerned. 

But they only account for a certain percentage of the 5,581 services 
that we perform for 3,327 clients; the rest being permanent resident aliens 
and citizens of the United States. 

Due to his ability to speak the Polish Language, the District Agent 
again accompanied the Supervisor of Social Service and a Social Worker from 



SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

On June 30, 1967, the Division of Immigration and Americanization com- 
pleted fifty years of service to residents of the Commonwealth. To this 
Agent who has been with the Division the major portion of these years with 
assignments at Boston, New Bedford and Springfield, it has been a most 
rewarding experience to have assisted and guided nearly a quarter of a 
million residents of our state so that adjustment to their environment may 
result to the benefit of the state. 

During the past fiscal year, 3832 services were given to residents of 
forty-six localities in Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden and Hampshire counties. 
Forty-one individuals, former residents of this State now residing in other 
parts of the country, communicated with us seeking information and advice 
promised to them as a result of our contacts with them when they first came 
here to reside in our area. 

Letters of welcome to new immigrants were sent to 856 families advising 
them of our services to the foreign-born and inviting them to seek our 
assistance at any time. Replies were received from them seeking information 
in matters pertaining to their desire to become citizens, the reuniting of 
members of their immediate families still residing abroad and regulations 
pertaining to Selective Service registrations. 

Since the opening of EXPO 67 we have been deluged with inquiries from 
both citizens and aliens seeking advice about both the Canadian and United 
States Immigration Regulations for entry to Canada and reentering the United 
States. 

Immigration service continued to be the bulk of our work. Explanation 
of laws and the proper procedures to individuals interested in bringing 
relatives or friends to live in the United States was time-consuming and very 
difficult to us when it concerned individuals coming from abroad required to 
obtain alien employment certification. In most instances, applicants had 
received information from relatives or friends abroad stating - ,T I now 
understand that if I have a letter guaranteeing to me that a job is waiting 
for me, I will be permitted to immediately go to the United States". As 
the majority of the intended immigrants were unskilled, it has been practi- 
cally impossible to find employment for them. 

This past April, one of our cases pending before the United States 
Immigration Service since 1963 was brought to a successful conclusion and 
the alien was finally granted adjustment of his status under Section 245 of 
the Immigration and Naturalization Act. This case concerned a young man, 
native of Italy, born in September 1942, permanent resident of the United 
States since July 1956, found deportable having been convicted for criminal 
offenses committed after his entry. 



We assisted 30 Cuban parolees admitted subsequent to January 1, 1959 
and physically present in the United States for at least two years, in ad- 
justing to permanent residence under P.L. 89-732 Act of November 2, 1966. 
The majority of them were highly educated or technically skilled persons 
who have been unable to engage in their professions or technical field 
because they were only temporary residents. They were most appreciative of 
the opportunity given them by the United States Government to adjust their 
status. One of these cases concerned a man who has found it difficult to 
manage to provide for his wife and six children in the manner to which they 
were accustomed before entering this country. He had served in both the 
Cuban and United States Air Forces and while there had become a skilled 
airplane mechanic. Although his talent is needed, a nearby concern engaged 
in airplane manufacture could not accept him due to the fact they they are 
engaged in government work. It is also interesting to note that the spouse 
of this man was born in the United States, was taken to Cuba at a tender age, 
voted in a political election in that country, was admitted to the United 
States as a Cuban parolee and last March had her status adjusted to a per- 
manent resident. As a result of the United States Supreme Court decision of 
May 29, 1967 in the case of Afroyim v. Rusk , she may now be considered a 
citizen. We corresponded with the United States Department of State concern- 
ing her loss of United States Nationality. As a result of information re- 
ceived from them, we have corresponded with the United States Naturalization 
Service for an adjustment of her status. A favorable decision in her case 
will enable her to seek employment at the above-mentioned concern, permit 
her husband to immediately apply for citizenship and permit her minor chil- 
dren to derive citizenship through parents. 

Since the decision of the United States Supreme Court in the case of 
Afroyim v. Rusk on May 29, 1967, we have corresponded with the United States 
Department of State, Washington, D.C. on other cases requesting a review of 
loss of nationality by voting in foreign elections. Subsequently, we have 
been advised that certificates of loss of nationality of United States have 
been vacated and contact should be made with the United States Naturaliza- 
tion Service for adjustment of status of the individuals. There is no doubt 
that we will be called upon to assist numerous individuals with similar 
problems during this coming year. 

The Agent has attended final naturalization hearings and has enjoyed 
the privilege of meeting with the naturalization examiner, clerk of court 
and the Judge sitting at the various sessions. At the conclusion of these 
court hearings, former clients have approached the Agent in the court for 
the purpose of seeking further advice and assistance of the office in either 
sponsoring relatives or obtaining certificates of citizenship for their 
children. 

All public and private agencies with whom we have been associated 
having interest in problems of the foreign-born, have been most cooperative. 
Through the year we have had contacts with the Adult Education Program 
and have furnished evening classes with booklets for use of adults preparing 
for citizenship. It must be pointed out that a fine spirit of cooperation 
with us was shown by the offices of the United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service at Springfield and Boston. 



LAWRENCE OFFICE 

The upward trend of services rendered by the Lawrence District Office 
continued during fiscal year 1966-67. Although the figure of 6,549 services 
for 1966 was an all-time high, an additional 694 services were rendered dur- 
ing this past fiscal year for a total of 7,243. 

Services for Cubans continue to pl£.y a major part of our work. With the 
amendment to the law whereby Cuban refugees can adjust their status to that 
of permanent residents without having to leave the country, our office was 
kept busy completing forms and explaining procedures. Furthermore, we are 
continuing to complete Family Status Cards for Cubans to bring their relatives 
from Cuba under the Air-lift which has been in effect since December, 1965. 

The liberalization of the immigration laws and the easing of quota re- 
strictions also is serving to increase our workload. Relatives from Italy 
and Greece, expecially, who never dreamed they would live to see America are 
coming in ever increasing numbers. It is a source of satisfaction to us to 
realize we had a part in reuniting these families, many of whom have been 
separated for years. 

"Reverse restrictions", if a phrase may be coined,, are continuing to 
plague our friends from Canada and other Western Hemisphere countries because 
of labor clearances. Where it was so easy to bring brothers and sisters from 
Canada, Mexico and other Western Hemisphere countries, and so difficult to 
bring them from Greece and Italy, the reverse is true now. This will con- 
tinue until a report by a special committee is made in Washington regarding 
Western Hemisphere immigration. It is hoped that these restrictions will be 
eased, 

A large part of our work this past year dealt with the completion of 
forms to bring persons with needed skills to the United States. We have been 
working closely with a large manufacturing firm in Lowell who need skilled 
workers. 

Our office was also busy during the past year with applications for 
citizenship. This Agent attended all the naturalization sessions in Lowell 
and in Lawrence, and again, it was most satisfying to see the pride and 
happiness in the faces of many whom we assisted as they achieved the coveted 
goal of United States citizenship. 

Other services included the translation of documents from French, German, 
Arabic and Italian; the completion of applications for United States pass- 
ports and the referral of newcomers with problems other than immigration and 
citizenship to the proper resources. 

Our relations with public and private agencies both at home and abroad 
continue to be excellent and we constantly receive their full cooperation in 
behalf of our clients. 



FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The Fall River Branch Office terminated its fiscal year 1967 with a 
total of 4,394 services rendered to individuals residing in 39 separate 
cities and towns in Southeastern Massachusetts* In classifying and records 
ing the work at this office we used the basis of services and that of a 
client count which numbered a total of 2,253 individuals served* These ser- 
vices dealt exclusively with immigration and citizenship laws which are of 
a complex nature and vague to the ordinary lay person who has not studied 
or dealt in this field as he would not be familiar with the comprehensive 
interpretations of all the various laws* 

W »th President Johnson l s signature on October 3, 1965, H. R. 2580 
became Public Law 89-236* When the President signed this bill at the foot 
of the Statue of Liberty it abolished a national origins quota system and 
eliminated discrimination because of race, creed or national origin* With 
the revision of the immigration law, numerous built-in equities were created 
thus liberalizing immigration quotas* 

During the past fiscal year, the impact of these new immigration laws 
were highly visible in the area of Southeastern Massachusetts. Approxima- 
tely 5,000 new immigrants settled and made their homes in the areas of Fall 
River, New Bedford, Taunton, the Attleboro's and surrounding towns and are 
continuing to arrive. These newcomers are joining our society for the first 
time and are sent a letter of welcome from the Fall River Branch Office 
explaining that if they have a problem concerning citizenship or immigra- 
tion they are invited to call or write this office* The response has been 
favorable and reasonably successful* 

Forty-eight separate nationalities were served in the Fall River 
Office of the Division. 

Leading this ethnic group, as it has been for the past twenty years, 
were natives of Portugal. There was also an increase in Polish immigration 
during the past fiscal year due to relaxing of the Polish exit visa authori- 
zing Polish nationals to emigrate to the United States. 

There were 200 naturalization applications completed in this Division 
Office along with 41 applications for certificate of citizenship. There- 
fore, it shows that citizenship in the southeastern area is a highly valued 
asset to the community. 

The Fall River Branch Office of the Division, with a weekly call to 
New Bedford, is there to give competent service to United states citizens 
and aliens, oldcamsrs and new, in their problems of immigration, naturaliza- 
tion, travel documents, correspondence with local, state and federal offices 
and their numerous other problems. 



g 

H 
CO 
O 

CO 



STATISTICAL DETAI 



Services Given 



For the Fiscal Year 7/1/66-6/30/67 



INFORMAT I ON 

Booklets, Forms, Blanks 

Ci tizenship " 

Immigration 

T r ave 1 

Other 



FORMS FILLED 



Change of Address (AR-11) 

Consulate Biographic Form (DSP-70) 
Visa Registration (FS497-497A) 



6413 



662 



342 



5064 



98 



247 



6250 



241 



to 
> 

H 



;734 



467 



579 



607 



11 



70 



1103 



35 



73 



Immig. Visa Application (FS-510) 
Notice as Representative (G-28) 

Annual Address Report (1-53) ~~ 

Lost Alien Reg, Card (1-90) 



Visa Petition-Temp. Help (I-129B) 

Visa Petition-Close Relative(I-130) 
Reentry Permit (1-131) ' 



133 



112 



250 



437 



249 



Skilled Worker Petition (1-140) 

Permit to Return after Depor. (1-212) 

Suspension of Deportation (I-256A) 

Notice of Filing Brief (I-290B) 



Foreign Police Clearance (1-484) 

Registry form to make Record (1-485) 

Perm. Residence Application (1-485) 

Change Status to Student (1-506) 



Extension of time for Visitor (1-539) 
Legal Residence Information 

sent to Consuls (1-550) 



Petition under Orphans Act (1-600) 

Waiver of Excludability (1-601) 

Waiver under Exchange Act (I-612)__ 
Other Immigration Forms 



883 



174 



53 



36 



236 



30 



281 



237 



12 



50 



180 



U 

z 
a 

OS 

< 
-4- 



Q 

i 

H 
fa 
O 
2 

M 

a 
a* 

CO 



w 
H 

CO 

u 

a 
o 
5 



3517 



195 



594 



2265 



272 



191 



1639 



48 



23 



48 



63 



43 



428 



25 



180 



33 



43 



45 



63 



11 



Declaration of Intention (N-300) 

Petition for Naturalization (N-400) 
Repatriation of American born 

Citizen (N-401) 



Petition for Nat'l.of Child (N-402)__ 
Duplicate Nat'l. Certificate (N-565) 
Proof of Citizenship for use 

Abroad (N- 577) 



Verification of Arrival (N-585) 

Derivative Citizenship Cert.(N-600) 
Other Naturalization Forms 



Cuban Ad justment-Residence( I-485A) 
Biographic Information (G-325A) 



27 



18 



80 



979 



54 



87 



98 



197 



394 



909 



198 



29 



176 



16 



54 



7 



48 



76 



43 



44 



11 



158 



2254 



292 



783 



950 



164 



65 



755 



90 



(fl 



H 

O 

H 



.i 



ALL (OFFICES 



3205 



404 



817 



1447 



623 



1058 



35 



4 



25 



110 



57 



46 



8 



8 



37 



19 



11 



11 



41 



10 



148 



28 



21 



53 



153 



170 



22 



73 



3- 



20 



214 



33 



144 



42 



20 



101 



12 



13 



15 



172 



8 



15 



37 



80 



23 



34 



17,213 



2,020 



2,915 



10,333 



1,168 



577 



10,805 



469 



104 



195 



187 



321 



1,369 



397 



1,429 



245 
158 



39 



18 



357 



47 



558 



322 



19 



102 



121 



1,667 



103 



133 



129 



376 



119 



500 



1,264 



EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS^ 

Affidavit of Support 

Affidavit of Facts 



Certificate of Identity_ 

U.S. S. R. Exit Permit [ 

Polish Assurance 

Other Notarial 

Cuban Assurance 



Labor Clearance (ES-575) 



OTHER SERVICES 



Change of Status (Cards) 
Appearance at Hearings 



Interpretation & Translation^ 

Letters " 

Other 



5 

H 

O 

CQ 



1812 



1391 



77 



38 



> 

DC 

n 



309 



120 



22 



63 



147 



13 



74 



8009 



539 



120 



167 



U 

ca 

a 



603 



244 



96 



28 



123 



Q 




J 




tel 


OS 


H 


(I) 


fa 


H 


s 


a 


H 


u 


« 


os 


0. 


o 


w 


3 



138 



90 



34 



680 



49 



8 



69 



1355 



53 



1668 



5675 



13 



559 



51 



230 



45 



331 



208 



17 



43 



60 



320 



52 



986 



86 



276 



736 



52 



255 



425 



< 
H 
O 
H 



3,195 



2,053 



214 



17 



42 



135 



542 



47 



145 



11*109 



745 



132 



2^166 



7,921 



145 



NEWCOMER INTERVIEW. 



1500 



566 



129 



356 



161 



TOTALS 



33,984 



4,394 



7,243 



3,832 



5,581 



2,712 



45,034 



. 


Si I 

ETHNIC AND NATIONALITY 


S SPRING- 
5 FIELD 


i 
s 

TICS 


H 

,o 


Albania 


51 






3 


143 


197 


Algeria 


14 


- 


- 


1 


- 


15 


Antigua 


19 


- 


- 


m 


- 


19 


Arabia 












Argentina 


169 


10 


6 


7 


8 


200 


Armenia (R. or T.) 


23 


- 


57 


2 


91 


173 


Aruba 


2 


- 


- 


• 


- 


2 


Australia 


22 


a* 


7 


3 


26 


58 


Austria 


69 


2 


15 


22 


10 


118 


Bahamas 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Barbados 


355 


- 


- 


44 


4 


403 


Belgium 


61 


mU 


2 


28 


9 


100 


Bermuda 


36 


1 


- 


10 


16 


13 


Bolivia 


28 


- 


- 


1 


- 


29 


Brazil 


108 


21 


39 


9 


4 


187 


Br* Guiana 


25 


mm 


- 


4 


1 


30 


Bulgaria 


16 


- 


2 


- 


6 


24 


Canada 


1,720 


146 


1,006 


498 


433 


3,803 


Ceylon 


8 


— ,. 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Chile 


28 


*•• 


M s 


2 


1 


31 


China 


749 


165 


42 


20 


65 


1,041 


Colombia 


236 


2 


12 


7 


53 


310 


Costa Rica 


268 


- 


53 


m 


3 


324 


Cuba 


2,832 


2 


909 


186 


269 


4,198 


Cyprus 


1 


• 


25 


1 


- 


27 


Czechoslovakia 


79 


3 


21 


6 


13 


122 


Danzig 


15 


- 


- 


• 


1 


16 


Denmark 


22 


4 


10 


3 


5 


44 


Dominican Republic 


94 


• 


140 


2 


4 


240 


Ecuador 


56 


1 


96 


21 


12 


186 


Egypt_ 


81 


4 


13 


a 


20 


118 


El Salvador 


23 


• 


- 


• 


- 


23 


England 


488 


82 


108 


203 


139 


1,020 


Estonia 


9 


• 


1 


- 


1 


11 


Finland 


34 


• 


2 


8 


43 


87 


Formosa 


24 


- 


• 


3 


9 


36 


France 


174 


45 


67 


45 


51 


382 


Germany 


502 


70 


233 


249 


157 


1,211 


Ghana 


7 


6 


• 


— 


1 


14 


Greece 


1,531 


33 


848 


191 


370 


2,973 


Guatemala 


142 


7 


9 


- 


- 


158 


Haiti 


334 


m. 


5 


8 


4 


351 


Honduras 


306 


m 


35 


1 


3 


345 


Hong Kong 


31 


2 


31 


- 


15 


79 


Hungary 


128 


4 


57 


19 


30 


238 


Iceland 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


India 


61 


4 


78 


17 


90 


250 


Indonesia 


56 


8 


4 


26 


15 


109 


Iran 


76 


• 


13 


12 


14 


115 


Iraq__ 


21 


• 


9 


- 


5 


35 


Ireland 


1,003 


20 


32 


97 


97 


1,249 


Israel 


37- 


- 


10 


9 


34 


90 



53. 

54. 

55. 

56. 

57. 

58. 

59. 

60. 

61. 

62. 

63. 

64. 

65. 

66. 

67, 

68. 

69_ 

70. 

71. 

72* 

73. 

74. 

7S* 

76. 

77. 

?8* 

79* 

80. 

81.. 

82. 

83. 

34. 

85. 

86. 

87. 

88, 

89. 

90.. 

91. 

92. 

93. 

94. 

95, 

96. 

97. 

98. 

99. 
1O0. 
101. 
102. 
103. 



Italy 

Jamaica^ 

Japan 

Jordan^ 

Kenya 

Korea 



Latvia^ 
Lebanon^ 
Liber ia_ 
Libya 



Lithuania^ 
Macau 



Malaysia^ 
Mexico 



Montserrat^ 
Morocco 



Netherlands^ 
New Zealand^ 
Nicaragua 
Norway 



Other Countries^ 

Pakista n 

Palestine 
Panama 



Paraguay 
Peru 



Philippines^ 

Poland 

Portugal 



Puerto Rico_ 

Rumani a 

Scotland 



South Africa^ 
Spai n 

St. Lucia 

Sudan 

Sweden 



Switzerland^ 
Syria_ 



Thailand^ 

Trinidad 

Turkey 



Ukraine 

U.S.S.R._ 

United State s^ 

Uruguay " 

Venezue 1 a 

Vietnam 

Wales 



2 

O 
H 

O 

m 

4 4 106 



418 



68 



53 



20 



fit. « 

57 



17 



43 



126 



104 



42 



199 



81 



222 



12 



77 



21 



19 



64 



52 



45 



u 

§ 

3 



1.123 



13 



38 



530 



30 



118 



110 



12 



20 



114 



12 



104 



394 



1,108 



1.407 



88 



96 



8 



99 



36 



74 



101 



90 



299 



24 



279 



1,429 



37 



11 



8 



West Indies (Other) 
Yugoslavia 



106 



97 



TOTALS 



23.984 



4 



69 



223 



2,735 



29 



6 



397 



4^394 



i . 

§ a 

Q. Hi 



333 



302 



60 



21 



20 



11 



10 



19 



400 



357 



8 



11 



51 



25 



14 



48 



30 



29 



354 



11 



4 



7^243 

LI fc I III I I 



41 



12 



11 



3 

I 

1,037 



36 



43 



33 



71 



84 



19 



52 



17 



10 



12 



13 



28 



332 



144 



52 



8 



26 



8 



11 



23 



45 



479 



24 



23 



3,832 



660 



21 



19 



29 



11 



52 



11 



90 



27 



830 



12 



48 



5,581 



8 

H 
6,656 



762 



201 



68 



21 



135 



131 



770 



42 



319 



6 



229 



222 



23 



150 



33 



21 



199 



73 



28 



49 



159 



24 



122 
502 



2 X 723 



4,664_ 

14 



128 



233 




99, 

167 



10 



;04 



451_ 
28 



386 



3j489 

-^38 

34 

10. 

& 



130, 

179 



45,034^ 



7/1/66-6/30/67 


BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WOR- 
CESTER 


TOTALS 




5 


RESIDENCE OF APPLICANTS 






Abington 








5 


Acton 


15 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


15 


Acushnet 


- 


8 


— 


_ 


- 


8 


Adams 


- 


— 


— 


9 


- 


9 


Agawam 


- 


- 


_ 


85 


- 


85 


Amesbury 


1 


- 


14 


— 


- 


15 


Amherst 


22 


- 


i — 


27 


- 


49 


Andover 


3 


— 


141 


— 


- 


144 


Arlington 


303 


— 


6 


— 


- 


309 


Ashfield 


1 


— 


a. 


_ 


- 


1 


Ashland 


17 


- 


_ 


— 


- 


17 


Attleboro 


25 


69 


1 


- 


- 


95 


Auburn 


2 


— 


_ 


- 


64 


66 


Avon 


11 


— 


— 


— 


- 


11 


Ayer 


30 


— 


10 


— 


1 


41 


Barnstable 


22 


2 






1 


25 


Barre 


- 


- 


— 


- 


16 


16 


Bedford 


29 


— 


» 


- 


. - 


29 


Belcher town 


- 


- 


- 


15 


- 


15 


Bellingham 


7 


4 


— 


- 


- 


11 


Belmont 


212 


— 


— 


- 


- 


212 


Beverly 


27 


— 


4 


- 


- 


31 


Billerica 


40 


— 


15 


- 


- 


55 


Blandford 


- 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Boston 


11,290 


21 


124 


- 


44 


11,479 


Bourne 


24 


9 


- 


- 


- 


33 


Boxford 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Boylston 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


. 11 


Braintree 


55 


- 


6 


- 


- 


61 


Bridgewater 


56 


28 


— 


- 


- 


84 


Brimf ield 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Brockton 


185 


1 


7 


- 


- 


193 


Brookf ield 


1 


- 


- 


1 


32 


34 


Brookline 


858 


- 


9 


- 


- 


867 


Burlington 


102 


- 


- 


- 


- 


102 


Cambridge 


1,576 




8 




15 


1,599 


Canton 


54 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


Carlisle 


1 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


Carver 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Charlton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


29 


Chelmsford 


23 


- 


36 


- 


- . . 


59 


Chelsea 


454 


- 


12 


- 


8 


474 


Chester 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Chicopee 


9 


- 


- 


556 


- 


565 


Clinton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


116 


116 


Cohasset 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Concord 


36 


- 


4 


- 


- 


40 


Conway 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 



















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WOR- 
CESTER 


TOTAL 


Danvers 


31 




23 






54 


Dartmouth 


4 


174 


- 


- 


- 


178 


Dedham 


101 


- 


1 


- 


3 


105 


Deerfield 


- 


— 


— 


4 


- 


4 


Dennis 


1 


— 


— 


- 


- 


1 


Dighton 


- 


7 


— 


- 


- 


7 


Douglas 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


13 


Dover 


6 


— 


— 


- 


- 


6 


Dracut 


4 


- 


93 


- 


- 


97 


Dudley 


1 


- 


- 


- 


101 


102 


Duxbury 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


East Bridge water 


3 










3 


East Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


East Longmeadow 


- 


- 


- 


49 


- 


49 


Easthampton 


- 


- 


— 


29 


- 


29 


Easton 


9 


- 


— 


- 


- 


9 


Egremont 


1 


— 


— 


— 


- 


1 


Essex 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Everett 


411 


- 


6 


- 


- 


417 


Fairhaven 


8 


161 








169 


Fall River 


37 


2,172 


2 


- 


2 


2,213 


Falmouth 


28 


66 


- 


- 


- 


94 


Fitchburg 


13 


- 


- 


- 


66 


79 


Foxborough 


16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Framingham 


135 


- 


7 


- 


2 


144 


Franklin 


33 


- 


- 


— 


18 


51 


Freetown 


- 


11 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Gardner 


1 








61 


62 


Georgetown 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


4 


Gloucester 


166 


- 


- 


- 


- 


166 


Grafton 


5 


- 


- 


- 


98 


103 


Granby 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


8 


Granville 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Great Barrington 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Greenfield 


1 


- 


- 


8 


- 


9 


Groton 


8 


- 


1 


- 


- 


9 


Grove land 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Hadley 








1 




1 


Halifax 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Hamilton 


28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Hampden 


- 


- 


- 


10 


- 


10 


Hanove r 


3 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Hanson 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Hardwick 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


13 


Harvard 


1 


- 


2 


- 


- 


3 


Harwich 


6 


— 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Haverhill 


36 


- 


364 


- 


- 


400 


Hingham 


20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 



















BOSTON 


FALL 
•RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WOR- 
CESTER 


TOTAL 


Ho lb rook 


19 










19 


Holden 


- 


— 


— 


— 


54 


54 


Holliston 


46 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


46 


Hoi yoke 


4 


— 


— 


316 


- 


320 


Hope dale 


2 


— 


— 


— 


- 


2 


Hudson 


18 


— 


3 


- 


34 


55 


Hull 


35 


_ 


- 


— 


- 


35 


Ipswich 


62 










62 


Kingston 


29 




6 




. 


35 


Lake vi lie 




1 








1 


Lancaster 


18 


— 


_ 


- 


95 


113 


Lawrence 


40 


— 


3.443 


- 


- 


3,483 


Lee 


— 


— 




11 


- 


11 


Leicester 


- 


— 


— 


2 


62 


64 


Lenox 


1 


— 


— 


3 


- 


4 


Leominster 


8 


— 


— 


1 


40 


49 


Lexington 


96 


— 


— 


- 


- 


96 


Lincoln 


27 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


27 


Littleton 


12 


— 


4 


- 


- 


16 


Longmeadow 


1 


— 


— 


71 


- 


72 


Lowell 


57 


— 


1,947 


- 


- 


2,004 


Ludlow 


- 


— 




131 


- 


131 


Lynn 


394 


- 


9 


- 


2 


405 


Lynnf ield 


7 


— 


— 


- 


- 


7 


Maiden 


260 


3 






. 


263 


Manchester 


9 


— 


— 


- 


- 


9 


Mansfield 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Marblehead 


24 


— 


- 


- 


- 


24 


Marion 


1 


3 


2 


- 


- 


6 


Marlborough 


41 


— 


- 


- 


61 


102 


Mar shf ield 


45 


- 


— 


- 


- 


45 


Mashpee 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Mattapoisett 


- 


15 


— 


- 


- 


15 


Maynard 


18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


Me df ield 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Medford 


363 


- 


- 


- 


- 


363 


Medway 


22 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


Melrose 


121 


- 


- 


- 


1 


122 


Merrimac 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


5 


Methuen 


14 


- 


384 


- 


- 


398 


Middleborough 


10 


5 


- 


- 


1 


16 


Middleton 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Milford 


23 


- 


- 


- 


142 


165 


Millbury 


1 


- 


- 


- 


63 


64 


Millis 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Milton 


51- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51 


Monson 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Montague 


9 


- 


- 


1 


- 


10 



















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WOR- 
CESTER 


TOTAL 


Nahant 


15 










15 


Nantucket 


- 


5 


— 


- 


- 


5 


Natick 


131 


- 


2 


- 


4 


137 


Needham 


61 


- 


— 


- 


- 


61 


New Bedford 


27 


1,164 


— 


- 


- 


1,191 


New Braintree 


- 


— 


— 


- 


1 


1 


New Marlborough 


- 


— 


— 


5 


- 


5 


Newbury 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


5 


Newburyport 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


5 


Newton 


628 


— 


20 


- 


- 


648 


Norfolk 


7 


_ 


— 


— 


- 


7 


North Adams 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


North Andover 


3 


— 


67 


- 


- 


70 


North Attleborough 


9 


11 


- 


- 


- 


20 


North Brookfield 


— 


— 


— 


- 


8 


8 


North Reading 


30 


— 


— 


- 


- 


30 


Northampton 


2 


— 


- 


27 


- 


29 


Northborough 


— 


— 


- 


- 


97 


97 


Northbridge 


4 


— 


- 


- 


24 


28 


Norton 


1 


10 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Norwood 


112 


— 


6 


- 


- 


118 


Oak Bluffs 


1 










1 


Oxford 


— 


— 


m 


- 


31 


31 


Palmer 








57 




57 


Paxton 


1 


— 


— 


- 


21 


22 


Peabody 


138 


- 


6 


- 


2 


146 


Pembroke 


24 


— 


- 


- 


- 


24 


Pepperell 


5 


— 


1 


- 


- 


6 


Petersham 


— 


— 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Pittsfield 


12 


_ 


- 


10 


- 


22 


Plainville 


3 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Plymouth 


25 


— 


— 


- 


- 


25 


Province town 


5 


7 


— 


- 


- 


12 


Quincy 


306 




2 




. 


308 


Randolph 


29 


4 


5 






38 


Raynham 


1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Reading 


43 


- 


10 


- 


- 


53 


Re hobo th 


1 


13 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Revere 


189 


- 


2 


- 


- 


191 


Rochester 


— 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Rockland 


20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Rockport 


7 


— 


1 


- 


- 


8 


Rowley 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Rutland 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


32 


Salem 


125 




1 




2 


128 


Salisbury 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


4 


Sandwich 


2 


3 


— 


— 


- 


5 



















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WOR 
CESTER 


TOTAL 


Saugus 


48 




18 






66 


Scituate 


70 


- 


— 


— 


- 


70 


Seekonk 


1 


3 


_ 


— 


- 


4 


Sharon 


15 


— 


_ 


_ 


- 


15 


Sheffield 


- 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Sherborn 


31 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


31 


Shirley 


6 


- 


— 


— 


- 


6 


Shrews bury_^ 


1 


— 


— 


— 


231 


232 


Somerset 


1 


120 


_ 


_ 


- 


121 


Some rvi lie 


1,060 


— 


- 


— 


2 


1,062 


South Hadley 


- 


_ 




49 


- 


49 


Southampton 


- 


— 


_ 


2 


- 


2 


Southborough 


6 


— 


_ 


— 


1 


7 


Southbridge 


2 


— 


_ 


2 


135 


139 


Southwick 


- 


— 


_ 


16 


- 


16 


Spencer 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


39 


39 


Springfield 


18 


— 


— 


1,935 


- 


1,953 


Sterling 


- 


— 


— 


- 


2 


2 


Stockbridge 


- 


— 


_ 


2 


- 


2 


Stoneham 


77 


— 


- 


- 


- 


77 


Stoughton 


51 


8 


2 


- 


- 


61 


Stow 


4 


— 


— 


— 


- 


4 


Sturbridge 


1 


— 


— 


- 


20 


21 


Sudbury 


22 


— 


— 


- 


- 


22 


Sunderland 


- 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Sutton 


- 


— 


— 


- 


1 


1 


Swampscott 


81 


— 


— 


- 


- 


81 


Swansea 


- 


58 


- 


- 


- 


58 


Taunton 


34 


127 








161 


Templeton 


- 


- 


— 


- 


1 


1 


Tewksbury 


15 


— 


54 


- 


- 


69 


Tisbury 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Topsfield 


7 


- 




i 


- 


7 


Truro 


2 


- 


— 


- 


- 


2 


Tyngsborough 


- 


— 


7 


- 


- 


7 


Tyringham 


- 


— 


— 


- 


1 


1 


Upton 










8 


8 


Uxbridge 


3 


— 


— 


1 


52 


56 


Wakefield 


48 










48 


Wales 


1 


- 


— 


- 


- 


1 


Walpole 


55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


55 


Waltham 


346 


- 


2 


- 


- 


348 


Ware 


- 


- 


1 


5 


4 


10 


Wareham 


6 


25 


- 


- 


- 


31 


Warwick 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


7 


Watertown 


522 


- 


2 


- 


- 


524 


Way land 


16 


- 


- 


- 


7 


23 


Webster 


5 


- 


- 


- 


197 


202 


Wellesley 


82 


- 


- 


- 


- 


82 


Wenham 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 



















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD ■: 


WOR- 
CESTER 


TOTAL 


West Boylston 










71 


71 


West Bridgewater 


11 


— 


— 


- 


- 


11 


West Brookfield 


1 


- 


— 


- 


7 1 8 


West Newbury 


1 


— 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


West Springfield 


- 


- 


- 


141 


- 


141 


Westborough 


1 


- 


- 


- 


51 


52 


Westfield 


2 


- 


- 


136 


1 


139 


Vvtstford 


- 


— 


20 


- 


- 


20 


Westminster 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Weston 


24 


- 


1 


- 


- 


25 


Westport 


1 


57 


- 


- 


- 


58 


We st wood 


40 


— 


— 


- 


- 


40 


Weymouth 


54 


— 


4 


- 


- 


58 


Whitman 


10 


— 


— 


- 


- 


10 


Wilbraham 


- 


- 


- 


33 


- 


33 


Williamsburg 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Williamstown 


- 


- 


— 


2 


- 


2 


Wilmington 


24 


— 


1 


— 


- 


25 


Winchendon 


1 


— 


- 


- 


1 


2 


Winchester 


42 


— 


6 


- 


- 


48 


Winthrop 


43 


- 


2 


- 


- 


45 


Woburn 


113 


- 


8 


- 


- 


121 


Worcester 


37 


- 


17 


- 


3 T 240 


3,294 


Wrentham- 


7 


6 


— 


- 


- 


13 


Yarmouth 


3 


5 








8 


Out of State 


366 




258 


41 


9 


674 


TOTAL 


23,984 


4,394 


7,243 


3,832 


5,581 


45^034 


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